Tag Archives: theatre

Dust | Review

★★★★☆  DEM Productions, Trafalgar Studios

Dust is a bold, honest and heartbreaking one woman show about mental health, depression and the aftermath of a suicide.

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Milly Thomas as Alice in Dust | The Other Richard

Alice struggles with mental health and one day she gives up and kills herself, but she’s stuck. She’s like a fly on the wall, in-between worlds, watching the aftermath of her death and  the effects it has on the people around her. We first meet her on the mortuary slab, where she examines her dead body, almost like she’s looking at someone else. We’re with her when she’s at her own funeral, when she commits suicide and when she wants to hug her parents.

There a light and funny times during the play, where Alice jokingly talks about things in her old life but the dark and more intense scenes, such as her suicide outweigh the lightheartedness. In combination with the mirrored stage by Anna Reid and the direction by Sarah Joyce, the show leaves an aftertaste of feeling lonely, vulnerable and weak.

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Milly Thomas as Alice in Dust | The Other Richard

 

The show itself has a millennial feel to it, not only because Alice is a typical millennial but it also focuses on issues like the addiction to smartphone and the constant urge to check social media that we all know to well.

Milly Thomas’s raw, vulnerable and more than honest performance transfixes the audience. I kept catching myself trying to hold my breath during certain scenes. The overall effect of the production is so powerful that it goes beyond thinking about it afterwards. It almost had a physical effect on me while watching it, unlike anything I’ve ever experienced when watching a show.

Dust runs at Trafalgar Studios until 13 October. Tickets are available here

 

Circa: Peepshow – Meet acrobat Ela Bartilomo

The Underbelly Southbank festival is in full swing and combines the best of Udderbelly Festival and London Wonderground, to bring you the best in circus, comedy and family entertainment.

Taking over Underbelly’s spiegeltent with a night club vibe is Circa’s Peepshow. Most of Peepshow’s music is an original track written by Ori Lichtik (Batsheeva Dance Company) with an interlude of Sweet Dreams (originally by Eurythmics). Peepshow lets audiences see the world from the other side of the mirror and turns cabaret on its head, literally.

Playing with the extreme physicality of this troupe of phenomenal acrobats, Circa blur lines between movement, dance, theatre and circus. Exploring the concept of looking and being looked at, Peepshow uses circus to explore themes of gender and sexuality on the stage.

Circa presents Peepshow at Underbelly Festival 2018 (Photo by Pedro Greig) (2)
Peepshow’s acrobat Ela Bartilomo |Pedro Greig

Millennial London spoke to one of Peepshow’s performers, acrobat Ela Bartilomo to find out more about the production:

Describe the show in three words.

Perception, Reality, the-space in-between

What part of the show amazes audiences the most?

Whilst the solo moments allow the audience to get to know each performer, and vice versa, the large pyramids of people stacked on top of one another seems to astound the audience. Especially when they appear under the stunning lights designed by Jason Organ.

What do you enjoy about being part of the production? 

There is so much I enjoy about the show – the shift of worlds, the challenging of expectations and the representation gender. Most of all I enjoy having the ability to truly be myself onstage. Though it’s great to step into a show someone else has performed before you and experience their world, there is something awesome about knowing you can show the audience as much of you as you want.

What does being an acrobat as part of Circa mean to you?

Being a Circa acrobat to me means being part of a family with one unanimous goal which is to make our audiences feel something. I am honored to be part of a company that is so respectful, kind and caring to one another, though there isn’t really another way to be in this kind of work. As our director Yaron Lifschitz said, “we are not male, female, young, LGBT, old, experienced, or new; we are all just acrobats, unique acrobats of course, but equal”.

What current themes are reflected in Peepshow? How are they explored?

The biggest subject we explore throughout the show is the way that our society perceives women, and men. Inspired by the world of a Peepshow, where men come to look at women to fulfill their own sexual desires and women come to make money and pay the rent. Through a cabaret/ burlesque inspired first half we portray an image of beauty and desire. However, in the second half of the show, we learn that our perceptions are not our realities and come to the great realisation that the image of sex is a façade, and that sexuality is not what we see when we look for it, but something that we find when we express ourselves. This is where our acrobatics have the ability to be raw and unfazed by any expectations we have set up earlier. In fact, we don’t even give our audience a chance to see the fast-paced toss sequences, or 3 back saults in a row as things move fast, that’s reality.

What do you want the audience to take away from the show?

In an ideal world I would love the audience to look back at the show, obviously impressed by the skills throughout, but more importantly, inspired to look at things differently, and realise that things that conflict our existing beliefs are genuine opportunities. Uncertainty and discomfort should be places to dwell and let your perceptions explore, like visiting a marketplace in a foreign country, our assumptions are our greatest downfall.

 

Circa’s Peepshow runs at Underbelly Festival until 18 August 2018

Five shows to see at Ed Fringe 2018

The sun is out and the city is booming with people enjoying ice cold drinks. This can only mean one thing, Edinburgh Fringe is around the corner. If you find yourself in Scotland’s theatre city, these five shows could be perfect for you:

3 Years, 1 Week and A Lemon Drizzle

3 Years, 1 Week and A Lemon Drizzle - courtesy of The Other Richard (5)
3 Years, 1 Week and a Lemon Drizzle | The Other Richard

3 Years, 1 Week and a Lemon Drizzle examines the relationship between two sisters and how their close bond was affected when one of them was diagnosed with a severe eating disorder as a teenager. Recalling touching memories, laugh-out-loud anecdotes and Mars bars, this searingly frank and painfully funny two-hander examines what it’s like to live with a loved one and their mental illness. 3 Years, 1 Week and a Lemon Drizzle seeks to show the powerful bond that endures throughout mental illness and reinforces the enduring message – you are not alone. Underbelly McEwan Hall (Jersey) from 1st August at 14:25 (not 13th).

Feed

Feed - courtesy of Michael Wharley (2)
Feed | Michael Wharley

Welcome to the stimulating world of Feed where emotions are the currency and your passions and fantasies will be indulged… for a price. After the sell-out successes of The Marked and The Fantasist, Theatre Témoin return, bringing their vibrant visual style to the world of click-bait culture, fake news and cyber gluttony. Using the incisive and gleeful spirit of bouffon, Theatre Témoin explore the dark absurdity of today’s media landscape and what capitalism has turned it into. Aided by Mentoring Dramaturg Chris Thorpe, Feed looks at how algorithms and capitalism are shaping the information we receive and consume online and how this information is, in turn, shaping us. Pleasance Dome (King Dome) from 3rd August at 14:00 (not 15th).

 

Hunch

Hunch - courtesy of Libby Burke Wilde
Hunch | Libby Burke Wilde

Written and performed by Kate Kennedy (BBC One’s Midsummer Night’s Dream, Channel 4’s Catastrophe and The Win Bin), produced by Edinburgh Fringe favourites DugOut Theatre (Replay, Swansong, The Sunset Five and Inheritance Blues) and directed by Old Vic 12’s Sara Joyce (Dust, Edinburgh Fringe and Soho Theatre; Hedda Gabler, The Bunker and The Scar Test, Soho Theatre), Hunch is a dark new comedy about a superhero and her power to make gut decisions. After using this power to save the lives of others, she starts calling the shots to save her own life. This funny and heartfelt piece celebrates the individual and restores one’s faith in oneself while teaching us that, more often than not, our own gut feeling is right. Assembly Roxy (Downstairs) from 1st August at 17:05 (not 13th).

Tamar Broadbent: Best Life

Tamar Broadbent - courtesy of Christine Coquilleau
Tamara Broadbent: Best Life | Christine Coquilleau

Award-winning songwriter Tamar Broadbent is back and this time she’s asking – how do you know if you’re living your best life? If you’re not, how do you go about changing it? This exciting musical comedy about ambition, anxiety and avocados promises to be her best show yet. Developed by Tamar and Sara Joyce, Best Lifebrings together mesmerising musical theatre, beautifully written songs and highly relatable observational comedy for which Broadbent’s dedicated Edinburgh audiences love her. Tamar is best known for her funny, catchy songs about single life in your twenties which she has toured around the UK and internationally. Underbelly Cowgate (Belly Laugh) from 2nd August at 14:20 (not 13th).

The Journey

The Journey
The Journey

The exciting world premiere of The Journey, written and directed by critically acclaimed stand-up comedian Stuart Laws comes to Pleasance this summer. Co-directed by Phoebe Ladenburg and starring Will Brown and Phoebe Sparrow, The Journey is a romantic comedy about a breakup, set on a spaceship. A play about self-obsession and toxic relationships, The Journey is a funny, relatable and surprising comedy following two people on the unstoppable journey of their relationship. Pleasance Dome (Ten) from Wednesday 1st August at 17.40 (not 3rd).

Tickets for any Edinburgh Fringe show are available here.

Inside Pussy Riot | Review

★★★★☆ Les Enfants Terribles, Saatchi Gallery

Inside Pussy Riot is a powerful and relevant immersive production that needs to be experienced.

Inside Pussy Riot - Les-Enfants Terribles - Production Shot
Roseanna Brear| Kenny Mathieson

In all honesty, I was very nervous before going into the play. Having previously read about Pussy Riot and Nadya Tolokonnikova, I couldn’t imagine how this would be turned into an immersive production.

Naturally, when being led into the first room, I was nervous. Surprisingly, Inside Pussy Riot starts out light and funny, when the audience are led into a room and an ‘incapable’ tour guide welcomes everyone. This was great as this made all of us feel more relaxed and it was a nice ice breaker to the experience.

Then we are led into a cathedral and encouraged to take part in a short protest, to show what we believe in. We get caught and arrested, interrogated and sentenced to labour camp and experience things similar (but toned down) to what Nadya went through during her time in the penal colony.

Inside Pussy Riot - Les-Enfants Terribles - Production Shot
Kenny Mathieson

However, having been to other Les Enfants Terribles productions, this one slightly dissapoints. Some things feel a bit forced and not as natural as in previous productions. There are also parts that slow down the story-telling.

Nonetheless, Inside Pussy Riot feels contemporary and right at the time, hinting at a Trump-led America and the Weinstein scandal that led to the uncovering of countless of other sexual abuse cases in the entertainment industry. It sets up the audience with just the right amount of anger before we are encouraged to vocalise our beliefs.

Another great thing is that it feels like a very millennial way of showing people social issues around the world. Instead of reading or hearing about those issues, we get to experience it, which has a much deeper impact. We walk away finding ourselves thinking: Would I stand up for my beliefs? How would I react in the same situation? Would I be brave enough to stand up for myself and for others?

Inside Pussy Riot - Les-Enfants Terribles - Production Shot
Kenny Mathieson

It seems as though the intention was to raise awareness of oppression, the judicial system and injustice, what happened to Nadya and other members of Pussy Riot and how quickly basic human rights can be taken away from you. As well as adding that typical Les Enfants touch of quirkiness to it, this was completely achieved.

Inside Pussy riot is an immersive production that needs to be experienced. It raises attention to important issues and shocks the audience, so be prepared!

Inside Pussy Riot runs at the Saatchi Gallery until 24 December.

@LesEnfantsTerr

 

Stick Man | Review

★★★★☆  Scamp Theatre, Leicester Square Theatre

Sally Cookson directs Stick Man and enchants kids with delightful music, creativity and playful characters.

Stick Man - courtesy of Steve Ullathorne_9
Lara Cowin (Stick Lady Love), Sam Heron (Stick Man) and Alex Tosh (Musician) | Steve Ullathorne

The best-selling adaptation by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler returns to the Leicester Square Theatre for the festive season. 

When Stick Man accidently gets pushed into a misadventure and taken away from his family, he sets out on a long journey back to find his tree and family again. On the way he encounters people and animals that often confuse him with an ordinary stick and he gets lost even more. Will he ever find his way back home?

Children’s laughter echoes through the theatre ignited through the shows comedic value, that even leaves adults chuckling in their seats. The whimsical stage design thrills and engages everyone in the audience, keeping children captivated throughout the performance. 

Stick Man - courtesy of Steve Ullathorne
Alex Tosh (Musician), Sam Heron (Stick Man) and Lara Cowin (Stick Lady Love) | Steve Ullathorne

Sam Heron embodies Stick Man and gives the character a voice that young audiences can interact with, while Lara Cowin plays his wife and other endearing characters. Everything that happens to Stick Man, Cowin conveys with charm and comedy.  

Alex Tosh (Musician) emphasises and compliments what’s happening in the play, with sounds and music. Many things are purely conveyed through music and choreography which sparks imagination and creativity in kids and adults alike.

Stick Man - courtesy of Steve Ullathorne_13.jpg
Sam Heron (Stick Man), Lara Cowin (Stick Lady Love) and Alex Tosh (Musician) | Steve Ullathorne

The show is an hour long which is the perfect amount to keep the children entertained without them becoming bored of sitting still. Every time the young ones engage in the play, many of their faces light up with excitement. It also breaks up the show, so they [the kids] don’t get restless.

This Christmas production fires up children’s imagination with props and loavable characters. A perfect family show to see during the festive season.

Stick Man runs at the Leicester Square Theatre until 7 January 2018.

@stickmanlive 

 

The Secret Keeper | Review

★★☆☆☆  National Theatre Studio,  Ovalhouse

The Secret Keeper promises mystical mystery but only delivers cringy songs and confusing themes.

The Secret Keeper - production image 1 - Angela Clerkin (photo by Sheila Burnett)
Angela Clerkin| Sheila Burnett

In a fairytale village the daughter of the Dollhouse maker has a ‘gift’. She helps her father by keeping his deepest and darkest secret which changes him. He tells everyone to share their most intimate secrets with her to feel better. But what happens when one girl knows all the secrets in the village, including who killed her uncle?

Going into the theatre the atmosphere is eerie and promises a night of gothic and mysterious tales. However, that is only partly the case. The show switches between styles, which is confusing and lowers the quality of the production.

The Secret Keeper - production image 4 - L-R Niall Ashdown _ Angela Clerkin (photo by Sheila Burnett)
Niall Ashdown and Angela Clerkin | Sheila Burnett

It starts out feeling like a fairytale and the audience expects to watch a gothic style play, but then the style suddenly switches to a much more modern tone. This ruins the illusion and rips the viewer out of the story. The constant switches make it difficult to get lost in the play.

Things happen that don’t need to happen as they don’t help to tell the story and move it along, such as spontaneous singing.

The Secret Keeper - production image 6 - L-R Anne Odeke _ Niall Ashdown (photo by Sheila Burnett)
Anne Odeke and Niall Ashdown | Sheila Burnett

The spontaneous songs might be fun in a different, more modern setting, but with the fairtytale-like setting they seem silly and unnecessary.

Parts of the production were confusing, such as the gathering of the secrets. It wasn’t needed for the development of the story as the Good Daughter already showed that she was struggling to keep the secrets in.

Overall, the intentions of the production were good with a great storyline. The premise is intriguing but the execution of the production thoroughly disappoints.

The Secret Keeper runs at Ovalhouse until 21 October

All the Little Lights | Review

★★★★★ Fifth Word, Arcola Theatre

Jane Upton’s ever so important and powerful play is heart-breaking, thought-provoking and cannot be missed.

Esther-Grace Button & Tessie Orange-Turner in ALL THE LITTLE LIGHTS by Jane Upton - credit Robert Day
Esther-Grace Button and Tessie Orange-Turner |Robert Day
In the midst of rubbish, wrappers, empty bottles and fallen autumn leaves just off the railway tracks, three young girls are celebrating a birthday. Joanne and Lisa reunite, while Amy wants to belong. Lisa got out, but now she’s back and their past is haunting her. Where alcohol abuse is celebrated, a life threatening game where entertainment and violence is normal. In a society where the forgotten just want to belong and predators lurk around the corner. When does the victim become the villain?

Tessie Orange-Turner & Sarah Hoare in ALL THE LITTLE LIGHTS by Jane Upton - credit Robert Day
Tessie Orange-Turner and Sarah Hoare | Robert Day
The play makes several important points. No one cares about children without a family, how easy it is to turn villain after being the victim and the horrendous, long-lasting effects of sexual abuse.

In times where you can’t flick on the news without men getting away with saying things like “grab them by the pussy” and making it seem normal, and Harvey Weinstein who uses his powerful position to sexually assault women, this play needs to be seen. It needs to be seen now.

People need to be made to feel uncomfortable, their hearts need to break for the girls and what they’ve had to go through.

Tessie Orange-Turner & Sarah Hoare in ALL THE LITTLE LIGHTS by Jane Upton - credit Robert Day
Tessie Orange-Turner and Sarah Hoare | Robert Day
All three leading ladies, Esther-Grace Button, Sarah Hoare and Tessie Orange-Turner are remarkable. It cannot be easy to convey three forgotten and vulnerable teenage girls, who all have had horrible things happen to them, but Button, Hoare and Orange-Turner take the audience on a dark journey through unimaginable experiences.

Jane Upton’s script, directed by Laura Ford is simple, touching and shocking that will have the audience holding their breaths.

All The Little Lights runs at the Arcola Theatre until 4th November.