Tag Archives: millenniallondon

Paper Creatures Theatre: Section 2 – an honest portrayal of mental health

A year after their successful debut production Flood,Paper Creatures Theatre are back at it again. This time they’re showcasing their play, Section 2, about mental health as part of the Breaking Out season at the Bunker Theatre.

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Section 2 | Paper Creatures Theatre

Jon Tozzi and Nathan Coenen, the founders of Paper Creatures look back at their first year: “We knew that it was a great show and that we had a great team behind us. Having a sellout run, with lovely reviews confirmed to us that we need to keep doing this and that it wasn’t just a one off for us. We were passionate about it. We met loads of new people and hopefully gained new audiences and now is our chance of spreading that net wider and reach new people”.

For their new show, the duo found playwright Peter Imms. Section 2 tells the story of Cam who is sectioned and how this affects him and the people around him.

 “When we read the script, both Jon and I were really blown away by how glaringly honest it was – a portrayal of what being in a mental health facility and being sectioned was.”

Coenen continues: “There’s a lot of mental health plays being done right now, but something about sectioning specifically and doing it in such a realistic way, really piqued our curiosity”.

Their goal for this new production is to demystify potential misconceptions about sectioning and the people that are sectioned. “People who’ve been sectioned have told us that they don’t really want to talk about it publicly because they’re afraid it might affect their careers or relationships. The desire to do this play has now spiraled into this passion to be able to hopefully create a piece of theatre that has a lasting effect on the audiences that come to see it, and hopefully create more of an awareness of this subject of sectioning”.

Jon: “We were very keen that it wasn’t just a production about what it’s like to be a patient. That’s something that Peter Imms wanted to address, that it should be a piece about the people around them as well and the importance of that and how it doesn’t affect just one person but it affects so many people.”

Paper Creatures got director Georgie Staight on board.

“They sent me the first draft and it was the writing that spoke first and even that first draft was completely beautiful which meant that I wanted to work with them.”

Jon: “I think it’s a very educational piece. The audience will come out of this knowing a lot more than they did before going in. The audience should feel like they’re a fly on the wall with this production. That they’re watching a real situation just pan out, because it’s coming from a place of such honesty”.

Director Georgie on working with the space in the Bunker Theatre:

“The story focuses around these people surrounding Cam. You see Cam in different kind of stages of distress and comfort. I’m interested in how we stage and play out Cam’s mental state. A lot of it can be portrayed physically and metaphorically and through sound and staging. The Bunker is an interesting space, you have to tailor it specifically”.

Another thing that was important to them was to raise awareness and start a conversation about mental health and being sectioned. “We know with the play there has to be an element of outreach to it. So from the get go we got in touch with the charity Mind and they’ve been so generous with their time. I’ve spoken to about eight individuals who’ve previously been sectioned. We have some short films for the public to see and open up the conversation. We’re also going to do post-show talks with the creative team, people who have been sectioned and charity representatives so we can contribute to this debate.”

Section 2 plays at the Bunker Theatre on Tuesdays and Fridays from 11 June to 7 July. Tickets can be booked here.

Five shows to see at Ed Fringe 2018

The sun is out and the city is booming with people enjoying ice cold drinks. This can only mean one thing, Edinburgh Fringe is around the corner. If you find yourself in Scotland’s theatre city, these five shows could be perfect for you:

3 Years, 1 Week and A Lemon Drizzle

3 Years, 1 Week and A Lemon Drizzle - courtesy of The Other Richard (5)
3 Years, 1 Week and a Lemon Drizzle | The Other Richard

3 Years, 1 Week and a Lemon Drizzle examines the relationship between two sisters and how their close bond was affected when one of them was diagnosed with a severe eating disorder as a teenager. Recalling touching memories, laugh-out-loud anecdotes and Mars bars, this searingly frank and painfully funny two-hander examines what it’s like to live with a loved one and their mental illness. 3 Years, 1 Week and a Lemon Drizzle seeks to show the powerful bond that endures throughout mental illness and reinforces the enduring message – you are not alone. Underbelly McEwan Hall (Jersey) from 1st August at 14:25 (not 13th).

Feed

Feed - courtesy of Michael Wharley (2)
Feed | Michael Wharley

Welcome to the stimulating world of Feed where emotions are the currency and your passions and fantasies will be indulged… for a price. After the sell-out successes of The Marked and The Fantasist, Theatre Témoin return, bringing their vibrant visual style to the world of click-bait culture, fake news and cyber gluttony. Using the incisive and gleeful spirit of bouffon, Theatre Témoin explore the dark absurdity of today’s media landscape and what capitalism has turned it into. Aided by Mentoring Dramaturg Chris Thorpe, Feed looks at how algorithms and capitalism are shaping the information we receive and consume online and how this information is, in turn, shaping us. Pleasance Dome (King Dome) from 3rd August at 14:00 (not 15th).

 

Hunch

Hunch - courtesy of Libby Burke Wilde
Hunch | Libby Burke Wilde

Written and performed by Kate Kennedy (BBC One’s Midsummer Night’s Dream, Channel 4’s Catastrophe and The Win Bin), produced by Edinburgh Fringe favourites DugOut Theatre (Replay, Swansong, The Sunset Five and Inheritance Blues) and directed by Old Vic 12’s Sara Joyce (Dust, Edinburgh Fringe and Soho Theatre; Hedda Gabler, The Bunker and The Scar Test, Soho Theatre), Hunch is a dark new comedy about a superhero and her power to make gut decisions. After using this power to save the lives of others, she starts calling the shots to save her own life. This funny and heartfelt piece celebrates the individual and restores one’s faith in oneself while teaching us that, more often than not, our own gut feeling is right. Assembly Roxy (Downstairs) from 1st August at 17:05 (not 13th).

Tamar Broadbent: Best Life

Tamar Broadbent - courtesy of Christine Coquilleau
Tamara Broadbent: Best Life | Christine Coquilleau

Award-winning songwriter Tamar Broadbent is back and this time she’s asking – how do you know if you’re living your best life? If you’re not, how do you go about changing it? This exciting musical comedy about ambition, anxiety and avocados promises to be her best show yet. Developed by Tamar and Sara Joyce, Best Lifebrings together mesmerising musical theatre, beautifully written songs and highly relatable observational comedy for which Broadbent’s dedicated Edinburgh audiences love her. Tamar is best known for her funny, catchy songs about single life in your twenties which she has toured around the UK and internationally. Underbelly Cowgate (Belly Laugh) from 2nd August at 14:20 (not 13th).

The Journey

The Journey
The Journey

The exciting world premiere of The Journey, written and directed by critically acclaimed stand-up comedian Stuart Laws comes to Pleasance this summer. Co-directed by Phoebe Ladenburg and starring Will Brown and Phoebe Sparrow, The Journey is a romantic comedy about a breakup, set on a spaceship. A play about self-obsession and toxic relationships, The Journey is a funny, relatable and surprising comedy following two people on the unstoppable journey of their relationship. Pleasance Dome (Ten) from Wednesday 1st August at 17.40 (not 3rd).

Tickets for any Edinburgh Fringe show are available here.

Millennials and the theatre: They’re getting the plot wrong

A lot of young people are not interested in going to the theatre for several reasons, but the benefits of regularly seeing a show outweigh their doubts

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From the Adelphi theatre in the West End to a fringe show in a 15 seat theatre in East London. The city offers endless amounts of theatrical productions. Revivals, musicals, straight plays and comedies, the choices are endless and cater to every taste. Whether you want a night of dramatic over the top colourful costumes and catchy songs, or a two-actor hour long play that will have you thinking about it for hours afterwards. The choices are as diverse as the audience, or is the audience not as varied as it could be?

According to Andrew Lloyd Webber, London is now behind Broadway with only three new musicals opening until May 2017, whereas New York has 14 new shows.  Instead of supporting new work and giving new writers opportunities to showcase their work, London produces a lot of revivals. But Lloyd Webber claims, it’s not because the West End is not giving enough chances to young writers and producers. He’s criticising the lack of education in the arts in British schools. If there’s no proficient arts education in schools, how are young people supposed to get interested in the arts, particularly the theatre?

Millennials attitudes towards theatre

There’s a community of young theatre lovers in London that can’t imagine anything better than sitting inside an old building and watching people perform. Unfortunately, even more people of the younger generation have no interest in this art form or have the wrong idea about it. The most common thoughts about the performing arts are that it’s unaffordable, not knowing what to expect and thinking it’s too old fashioned.

It’s clear that something needs to change. The theatre has been around for so long, because it has evolved and changed throughout hundreds of years. From the Shakespeare Globe, with bad lighting to contemporary theatre and special effects. The theatre has to change with the times.

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The Harold Pinter Theatre | Sarah Louhichi
However, there’s something about the theatre that is captivating and magical. A good play can make you feel like the last two hours flew by in five minutes.

Culture is an important part of human development. Art has always been used as a way of trying to make sense of the world. Whether it’s through a painting, a sculpture or other artistic creations. Most plays and even musicals are written to highlight problems around the world, in our daily lives, and the way we live and how we might influence the future. Shows usually bring attention to things that should concern all of us.  A lot of plays will have you thinking about its content hours after you’ve left the theatre, because you’ll be drawing connections to contemporary life.

It’s going to make you feel emotions that compare to nothing else. Having something happen right in front of you, is unlike any other medium or type of entertainment. Every performance is different, not considering the big hick ups that might happen. Each show the actors might use a different tempo in a monologue or use different facial expressions. Sometimes the energy in the theatre is so intense that you can’t help but feel excited. Being part of a show is always something unique, you’ll never know how other performances went and how other audience members have experienced it. Unless, you see a show several times, but that’s a whole new topic.

There’s a community of theatre lovers that can’t wait to share their favourite hobby with others. Whether they’re theatre blogger, frequent visitors or actively performing. Thanks to social media you can not only connect with the actors and production team of each show, you can also be part of a huge community that is happy to arrange theatre trips and share their thoughts and feelings about issues in the industry.

It’s understandable that a visit to the theatre seems a bit daunting. Not knowing what to expect, how to behave and what you’re going to experience can be scary for anyone who has no knowledge of anything theatre related. However, once you’ve given it a try and see a production that’ll take your breath away, the benefits of regularly attending shows and letting culture into your life, will be clear.

The Enchanted | Review

★★★☆☆ Pharmacy Theatre, The Bunker

An intense and brave tale of evil, the death penalty and the human inside a monster.

The Enchanted
The cast of The Enchanted | Dina T.

The play based on the novel by Rene Denfeld looks at the person behind a murderer and the death penalty. Waiting for your death on death row is lonely. Arden is mute and as he waits for his day, he listens and watches an investigator trying to save some of the prisoners from their deaths. While doing so, she uncovers the sad and disturbing past of some of the ‘monsters’ in the maximum security prison.

The choreography by movement director Emily Orme, conveys a sense of helplessness and sadness that carries throughout the whole play, with an eerie undertone through the music.

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The Cast of The Enchanted | Dina T.

The stage and background are completely white and chalk is used to draw on it. However sometimes it doesn’t have enough of an impact as the light blue colour of the chalk gets lost easily.

The use of puppetry shows a certain vulnerability each of the characters have, it’s done so delicate and creatively it adds to the aesthetics of the show. However, the puppets are always used during narration, therefore they have to compete for the audiences’ attention with the actor on stage and it looses its impact slightly. It would’ve worked better if they had been on stage by itself.

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Corey Montague-Sholay (Arden) | Dina T.

Corey Montague-Sholay who plays the narrator and Arden, a silent killer is captivating. He captured the essence of his character and the play so well, it’s beguiling and so compelling that it would probably work with just him telling the story of all the other characters.

The Enchanted runs at The Bunker until 17 June.

Alice’s Adventures Underground|review

★★★★★ Les Enfants Terribles, The Vaults

Alice’s Adventures Underground is an unmissable production that has created the most imaginative way of telling a story.

ALICE'S ADVENTURES UNDERGROUND. Richard Holt 'Hatter' and Philippa Hogg 'March Hare'. ©Rah Petherbridge Photography
Alice’s Adventures Underground | Alex Gilbert

Upon arrival, it feels like walking into a different, whimsical world. Before the performance has even started, you find yourself in awe by the creative design and themed (and strong!) cocktails. Once the journey begins, it’s up to you where it will lead. Alice’s Underground Adventure is unlike anything I’ve seen at The Vaults.

Instead of watching the story unfold right in front of you, you’re part of it and not only that, it’s like stepping into it and you decide where the adventure will take you. Depending on what route you choose, either shrink by taking a drink or grow by having a sweet, you steer your journey through Wonderland.

The Queen of Hearts has turned so evil, chopping off people’s heads for anything. An underground group grows and tries to ignite a revolution…Will you be part of the secret revolution? Or will you be on the Queen’s side?

Be wary that if you’ve come with someone you might not end up with them, as groups are split throughout the production. This is done by picking a playing card and depending on the suit you have chosen, you have to complete a different secret mission.

ALICE'S ADVENTURES UNDERGROUND. Philippa Hogg 'Alice'. ©Rah Petherbridge Photography
Alice in Alice’s Adventures Underground | Alex Gilbert

The design and details are the most interesting thing about this immersive production. You could go several times and still find new things and discover details about this incredible underground world that you haven’t seen before. Besides the creative set up, the actors (or interactors) are the other wonderful thing. Not only do they stay in character the whole time, they also interact incredibly well with the audience. They have an off-the-cuff humour and the talent to improvise, which you find endearing.

Another amazing thing is that the cast switches roles, so if you come twice you’re likely to see different people play different characters. Combined with the different story lines, it’s possible to go several times and still experience something completely new.

by Al Overdrive
Alice’s Adventures Underground | Alex Gilbert

The best part about this adventure is that you’ll actually feel like you’re part of it, you’re making a difference in the story. It’s almost heartbreaking leaving the characters and Wonderland behind. The intricate details of the production won’t leave your mind, even after leaving the venue.

Alice’s Adventures Underground runs at The Vaults until 23 September 2017

@AliceUnderLDN

Pluto | Review

★★★★☆ Moonchild Theatre Company| Baron’s Court Theatre

Moonchild Theatre Company stages an impressive first production of a new play that captures many important issues in today’s world, by personifying likeable planets, comets and moons.

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Liam Joseph (Pluto) and Charlotte Price ( Professor Furtham/ Charon) |Moonchild Theatre Company

The New Horizons probe lands on Pluto in 2006 and brings bad news for the planet, who is currently having a party which no one has turned up to, except for his best friend Charon. The probe that arrives bears news from NASA telling PLUTO that he’s no longer a planet. He’s now labelled a ‘Dwarf Planet’ which throws Pluto into total chaos, “I’ve been conned into hosting my own funeral”. He’s confused about his identity and has only Charon (and a stripper she hired), to cheer him up and help him to understand.

“Pluto: The subject of much confusion,” as his friend Charon puts it, is mirroring people in our society who have things decided for them, often by men in power who cannot even begin to understand their situation.

The production touches on a fair amount of social and political issues, maybe too many to completely be sure of its message. The staging is sparse but it works, due to the dark walls of the tiny Baron’s Court Theatre, giving you a feeling of deep space.

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Liam Joseph (Pluto) | Moonchild Theatre Company

Callum O’Brien takes Pluto and turns his story into a perfect metaphor for issues such as labelling others, accepting people for who they are and feeling lonely. His direction is clear, fresh and ideal for millennials who would love to see their first play but are daunted by big Shakespearian productions.

The stripper scene is hilariously awkward. The overall humour of the play manages to cover up many of the issues and problems in today’s society.  Liam Joseph’s Saturn impression is brilliant and draws the audience on his side. He brings Pluto to life and turns him into a character that you like instantly. He’s not just a planet but a man with a heart and soul.

Charon, played by Charlotte Price is extremely gripping and intriguing. You find yourself hanging to every word during her monologue about her friendship to Pluto. She simply leaves you wanting more.

Pluto might not be as smooth sailing as a West End production might be, but as a brand new play, it definitely is a strong first production for the Moonchild Theatre Company who’ve managed to capture the current issues perfectly.

Pluto runs at Baron’s Court Theatre until 23 April and will transfer to the Cockpit Theatre from 14 August until 17 August.

#iheartPLUTO @MoonchildPluto

This must be the place | Review

★★★★☆ Poleroid Theatre, The Vaults

Poleroid Theatre presents a captivating tale of living in the 21st century, connectivity and breaking free from old lives.

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(Left to right) Feliks Mathur (Tate), Hamish Rush (Matty) Molly Roberts (Lily) and James Cooney (Adam) | Mathew Foster

Many dream of living in London, but with sky high house prices and the pressures of life in the capitol, only few make it.

This Must Be The Place tells the story of Adam, a young Londoner who is sick of city life, everyday rush hour, unaffordable flats and bad financial situations. He needs a clean break. One day after work he throws his phone into the Thames and disconnects himself from everything and everyone. He needs to find home.

Somewhere else, two friends are ready for a new start. With hopes of a better future, they are ready to leave their problems behind and head off to London.

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James Cooney (Adam) | Mathew Foster

The play explores relationships in the 21st century. In a society where mobile phones hold more value to people than real life connections. A like on social media is more important than a meaningful conversation with a friend, and sharing anything with anyone in the world is more interesting than talking to your family.

We’re addicted to our phones and the abilities to do it all, whether it’s through connecting with people across the world, or to give you answers to every possible question you might need to know. This play shows us that we’ve disconnected ourselves from reality and the outside world while being so connected, we’re essentially on our own.

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Feliks Mathur (Tate) and Hamish Rush (Matty) | Mathew Foster

These two stories are are creatively intertwined. Directed by Justin Audibert and Josh Roche, they conquer the hearts of the audience with wit, honesty and words only. No props, costumes or setting is even needed. The words grab you and pull you into the lives of each character.

Poleroid Theatre explores the “Dark undercurrents of life in the 21st century” and gives young actors and writers a chance to develop and thrive. James Cooney (Adam), Feliks Mathur (Tate), Molly Roberts (Lily) and Hamish Rush (Matty) all achieve to captivate the audience.

This Must Be The Place runs at the Vaults during Vault Festival until 12 February.