Tag Archives: LDNtheatrebloggers

Beau Brummell- An elegant madness | Review

★★★☆☆ European Arts Company, Jermyn Street Theatre

This dark comedy about the celebrity Beau Brummell is entertaining but too long.

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Seán Brosnan (Beau Brummell) and Richard Latham (Beau’s valet) | Savannah Photographic

Beau Brummell; the first person who was famous for being famous. Nowadays, there are many alike him, The Kardashian clan being one of them. In the 18th century he was the modern narcissist, watching himself in the mirror all day long and letting people stare at him while he was getting dressed.

After a public incident with his friend the Prince of Wales, he’s forced to live in exile in Calais. Now poor, due to his lifelong addiction to gambling and driven into madness by Syphilis, Beau lives in a small flat in a covent with his valet. When the Prince of Wales, now King, comes to visit, Brummell hopes to be reinstated and be able to go back to his old life.

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Richard Latham (Beau’s valet) and Seán Brosnan (Beau Brummell) | Savannah Photography

On the surface, this play is well done. The set design is beautiful and intriguing, the acting is superb and leaves no reason for criticism. It’s funny and the dialogue is written well and witty with a lot of opportunities to make the audience chuckle. The story and the length of the the show is what lets the production down. It’s not clear what we’re meant to take away from the story.

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Seán Brosnan (Beau Brummell) and Richard Latham (Beau’s valet) | Savannah Photography

The production would’ve worked better in a shorter more compact version, as a lot of the conversations didn’t lead anywhere or uncover something essential. After a while it just felt stale.

Overall, it had its highlights through jokes and funny anecdotes, or the way that putting on his clothes was almost a sacred act.

Beau Brummell- An Elegant Madness runs at the Jermyn Street Theatre until 11 March.

@EuropeanArtsCo. #BeauBrummell @jstheatre

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This must be the place | Review

★★★★☆ Poleroid Theatre, The Vaults

Poleroid Theatre presents a captivating tale of living in the 21st century, connectivity and breaking free from old lives.

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(Left to right) Feliks Mathur (Tate), Hamish Rush (Matty) Molly Roberts (Lily) and James Cooney (Adam) | Mathew Foster

Many dream of living in London, but with sky high house prices and the pressures of life in the capitol, only few make it.

This Must Be The Place tells the story of Adam, a young Londoner who is sick of city life, everyday rush hour, unaffordable flats and bad financial situations. He needs a clean break. One day after work he throws his phone into the Thames and disconnects himself from everything and everyone. He needs to find home.

Somewhere else, two friends are ready for a new start. With hopes of a better future, they are ready to leave their problems behind and head off to London.

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James Cooney (Adam) | Mathew Foster

The play explores relationships in the 21st century. In a society where mobile phones hold more value to people than real life connections. A like on social media is more important than a meaningful conversation with a friend, and sharing anything with anyone in the world is more interesting than talking to your family.

We’re addicted to our phones and the abilities to do it all, whether it’s through connecting with people across the world, or to give you answers to every possible question you might need to know. This play shows us that we’ve disconnected ourselves from reality and the outside world while being so connected, we’re essentially on our own.

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Feliks Mathur (Tate) and Hamish Rush (Matty) | Mathew Foster

These two stories are are creatively intertwined. Directed by Justin Audibert and Josh Roche, they conquer the hearts of the audience with wit, honesty and words only. No props, costumes or setting is even needed. The words grab you and pull you into the lives of each character.

Poleroid Theatre explores the “Dark undercurrents of life in the 21st century” and gives young actors and writers a chance to develop and thrive. James Cooney (Adam), Feliks Mathur (Tate), Molly Roberts (Lily) and Hamish Rush (Matty) all achieve to captivate the audience.

This Must Be The Place runs at the Vaults during Vault Festival until 12 February.

 

Henry V | Review

★★★☆☆  Antic Disposition, Southwark Cathedral

A beautiful adaptation of Henry V, but it’s missing something to make it unforgettable.

Antic Disposition’s production of Shakespeare’s Henry V, embarks on its second UK tour of the most historic cathedrals.

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British soldiers | Scott Rylander

It’s France 1915, the first world war and two groups of wounded soldiers, French and British are brought to the same military hospital. While recovering, the soldiers and nurses stage the production of Henry V – 500 years after the Battle of Agincourt.

It’s not something for a Shakespeare newbie. Since it’s not easy to place the story or understand the context, if you’re not familiar with it or haven’t done some research beforehand you might find it slightly confusing. In this case, it’s almost essential to get a programme and give it a good read through before the start of the show.

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Photo courtesy: Scott Rylander

The production moves between 1415 and 1915, and adds original songs with live music inspired by the poetry of AE Housman.Whereas the transition between reality and play are smooth, you need to have some knowledge of Henry V to distinguish these at once.

The play being performed solely in cathedrals, gives it an opportunity that it wouldn’t have in a regular theatre and it’s obvious what was behind the thought process. It gives it the chance to use the acoustics to its advantage. The vast cathedral, with its high ceilings makes some scenes, songs and the sound of bombing more powerful, making the play more intense. However, the acoustics are also the downfall for the production. If the actor doesn’t directly face you, it is barley distinguishable what they are saying, therefore you’re losing out on the story.

Even though the cathedral makes the setting more unique and genuine, it has its downside as several scenes happen on the ground or sat down and even sitting in the second row, the view is obstructed resulting in missing out on several moments of the play.

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Floriane Andersen as Princess Katherine | Scott Rylander

The cast overall has uneven performances, some outstanding and touching, others rather forgettable. Floriane Andersen delivers a flawless performance, eloquently switching between English and French.

Anitc Dispostion’s Henry V tours across different cathedrals in the country until 22 February.

@Anticdispo #HenryV

Dirty Great Love Story | Review

★★★★☆  Arts Theatre, Dirty Great Love Story

Dirty Great Love Story is a quirky feel-good romantic comedy, perfect for fighting off those winter blues.

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Ayesha Antoine and Felix Scott | Richard Davenport

After a highly acclaimed UK tour, the Fringe First Award winning Dirty Great Love Story makes its West End debut.

Katie and Richard are two romantics that meet at a rather unromantic setting. Both are on a night out in a sweaty club and their drunken friends are trying to hook them up. The next morning they wake up hungover, barely remembering that they had slept together.

As soon as Katie gets the chance, she jumps out of bed and disappears. Richard is not her type, plus, she still needs to get over her Ex. However, as much as Katie would like to never see Richard again, fate has a different plan for them. Due to their friends, they keep bumping into each other, but does this mean they are meant to be?

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Felix Scott and Ayesha Antoine | Richard Davenport

Writers Richard Marsh and Katie Bonna create a wonderful love story that has the theatre shaking with laughter. Through its pop culture references and and modern feel, it’s relateable to any millennial everywhere. Some of us might see themselves in various characters, and recognise situations that mirror their own lives.

Pia Furtado directs Ayesha Antoine and Felix Scott who commit to their characters wonderfully and have the ability to change personas instantaneously, while they rhyme their way into the audiences’ heart.

Dirty Great Love runs at the Arts Theatre until 18 March 2017

@DirtyGreatLove #DirtyGreatLoveStory