Tag Archives: Interviews

Circa: Peepshow – Meet acrobat Ela Bartilomo

The Underbelly Southbank festival is in full swing and combines the best of Udderbelly Festival and London Wonderground, to bring you the best in circus, comedy and family entertainment.

Taking over Underbelly’s spiegeltent with a night club vibe is Circa’s Peepshow. Most of Peepshow’s music is an original track written by Ori Lichtik (Batsheeva Dance Company) with an interlude of Sweet Dreams (originally by Eurythmics). Peepshow lets audiences see the world from the other side of the mirror and turns cabaret on its head, literally.

Playing with the extreme physicality of this troupe of phenomenal acrobats, Circa blur lines between movement, dance, theatre and circus. Exploring the concept of looking and being looked at, Peepshow uses circus to explore themes of gender and sexuality on the stage.

Circa presents Peepshow at Underbelly Festival 2018 (Photo by Pedro Greig) (2)
Peepshow’s acrobat Ela Bartilomo |Pedro Greig

Millennial London spoke to one of Peepshow’s performers, acrobat Ela Bartilomo to find out more about the production:

Describe the show in three words.

Perception, Reality, the-space in-between

What part of the show amazes audiences the most?

Whilst the solo moments allow the audience to get to know each performer, and vice versa, the large pyramids of people stacked on top of one another seems to astound the audience. Especially when they appear under the stunning lights designed by Jason Organ.

What do you enjoy about being part of the production? 

There is so much I enjoy about the show – the shift of worlds, the challenging of expectations and the representation gender. Most of all I enjoy having the ability to truly be myself onstage. Though it’s great to step into a show someone else has performed before you and experience their world, there is something awesome about knowing you can show the audience as much of you as you want.

What does being an acrobat as part of Circa mean to you?

Being a Circa acrobat to me means being part of a family with one unanimous goal which is to make our audiences feel something. I am honored to be part of a company that is so respectful, kind and caring to one another, though there isn’t really another way to be in this kind of work. As our director Yaron Lifschitz said, “we are not male, female, young, LGBT, old, experienced, or new; we are all just acrobats, unique acrobats of course, but equal”.

What current themes are reflected in Peepshow? How are they explored?

The biggest subject we explore throughout the show is the way that our society perceives women, and men. Inspired by the world of a Peepshow, where men come to look at women to fulfill their own sexual desires and women come to make money and pay the rent. Through a cabaret/ burlesque inspired first half we portray an image of beauty and desire. However, in the second half of the show, we learn that our perceptions are not our realities and come to the great realisation that the image of sex is a façade, and that sexuality is not what we see when we look for it, but something that we find when we express ourselves. This is where our acrobatics have the ability to be raw and unfazed by any expectations we have set up earlier. In fact, we don’t even give our audience a chance to see the fast-paced toss sequences, or 3 back saults in a row as things move fast, that’s reality.

What do you want the audience to take away from the show?

In an ideal world I would love the audience to look back at the show, obviously impressed by the skills throughout, but more importantly, inspired to look at things differently, and realise that things that conflict our existing beliefs are genuine opportunities. Uncertainty and discomfort should be places to dwell and let your perceptions explore, like visiting a marketplace in a foreign country, our assumptions are our greatest downfall.

 

Circa’s Peepshow runs at Underbelly Festival until 18 August 2018

Paper Creatures Theatre: Section 2 – an honest portrayal of mental health

A year after their successful debut production Flood,Paper Creatures Theatre are back at it again. This time they’re showcasing their play, Section 2, about mental health as part of the Breaking Out season at the Bunker Theatre.

SECTION 2 FINAL.jpg
Section 2 | Paper Creatures Theatre

Jon Tozzi and Nathan Coenen, the founders of Paper Creatures look back at their first year: “We knew that it was a great show and that we had a great team behind us. Having a sellout run, with lovely reviews confirmed to us that we need to keep doing this and that it wasn’t just a one off for us. We were passionate about it. We met loads of new people and hopefully gained new audiences and now is our chance of spreading that net wider and reach new people”.

For their new show, the duo found playwright Peter Imms. Section 2 tells the story of Cam who is sectioned and how this affects him and the people around him.

 “When we read the script, both Jon and I were really blown away by how glaringly honest it was – a portrayal of what being in a mental health facility and being sectioned was.”

Coenen continues: “There’s a lot of mental health plays being done right now, but something about sectioning specifically and doing it in such a realistic way, really piqued our curiosity”.

Their goal for this new production is to demystify potential misconceptions about sectioning and the people that are sectioned. “People who’ve been sectioned have told us that they don’t really want to talk about it publicly because they’re afraid it might affect their careers or relationships. The desire to do this play has now spiraled into this passion to be able to hopefully create a piece of theatre that has a lasting effect on the audiences that come to see it, and hopefully create more of an awareness of this subject of sectioning”.

Jon: “We were very keen that it wasn’t just a production about what it’s like to be a patient. That’s something that Peter Imms wanted to address, that it should be a piece about the people around them as well and the importance of that and how it doesn’t affect just one person but it affects so many people.”

Paper Creatures got director Georgie Staight on board.

“They sent me the first draft and it was the writing that spoke first and even that first draft was completely beautiful which meant that I wanted to work with them.”

Jon: “I think it’s a very educational piece. The audience will come out of this knowing a lot more than they did before going in. The audience should feel like they’re a fly on the wall with this production. That they’re watching a real situation just pan out, because it’s coming from a place of such honesty”.

Director Georgie on working with the space in the Bunker Theatre:

“The story focuses around these people surrounding Cam. You see Cam in different kind of stages of distress and comfort. I’m interested in how we stage and play out Cam’s mental state. A lot of it can be portrayed physically and metaphorically and through sound and staging. The Bunker is an interesting space, you have to tailor it specifically”.

Another thing that was important to them was to raise awareness and start a conversation about mental health and being sectioned. “We know with the play there has to be an element of outreach to it. So from the get go we got in touch with the charity Mind and they’ve been so generous with their time. I’ve spoken to about eight individuals who’ve previously been sectioned. We have some short films for the public to see and open up the conversation. We’re also going to do post-show talks with the creative team, people who have been sectioned and charity representatives so we can contribute to this debate.”

Section 2 plays at the Bunker Theatre on Tuesdays and Fridays from 11 June to 7 July. Tickets can be booked here.