Tag Archives: fringe theatre

Muted | Review

★★★★★ Interval Productions, The Bunker Theatre

Sarah Henley’s heartbreakingly beautiful story of loss and love enchants the audience with emotional songs and astonishing voices.

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Muted | Savannah Photographic

Michael is the frontman of a band called Lost Boy. He and his friends are an inch away from becoming a success. Then his mother suddenly dies from a hit and run accident and he never speaks a word again. His friends desert him and he lives with his uncle. Years later, his ex-girlfriend Lauren and his friend Jake who is now Lauren’s boyfriend, want to make things good again. When the band gets another shot at stardom, Jake tries to get Michael back in the band, because the label wants him to be the frontman once again. When Lauren tries to bring Michael back to normal, old feelings are re-emerging and a dark truth uncovered.

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Teenage Michael ( Ed Campbell Bird) | Savannah Photographic

Jamie Jackson’s direction of the musical is fresh, artistic and contemporary, which works well with the venue, the story and the songs.

The teenage version of Michael, played by Ed Campbell Bird, appears as the inner voice of him, while he stays muted the teenage Michael sings and expresses his inner feelings. During flashbacks with the mother that explains their relationship, which was sometimes difficult, due to his mothers drinking and disappointment of his father leaving them. His uncle Will had to deal with the loss of the sister but couldn’t mourn her loss having cared for his nephew at a young age. Now he is torn between living his own life and staying with his nephew.

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Lauren ( Tori Allen-Martin) and Micheal (David Leopold) | Savannah Photographic

Michael played by David Leopold has the ability to show Michael’s pain and sorrow of losing his mother. His life being turned upside down, the confusion of not knowing who the driver was and his friends suddenly abandoning him weighs on him heavily. His facial expressions and body language convey his feeling’s perfectly, making you instantly connect with Michael. He is a lost boy, which coincides with the name of his former band.

Tori Allen-Martin is not only an incredible musician and writer, she plays her part as the ex-girlfriend that was driven away by her guilt and, feeling helpless but unearths old feelings for Michael. Her voice also touches everyone in the audience. It is soft, yet strong, beautiful and emotional.

Muted runs at the Bunker Theatre until 7 January 2017.

 

Pride and Prejudice | Review

★★★★☆ Two Bit Classics, Jermyn Street Theatre

This play is an intelligent and heartfelt adaption of the Jane Austen classic. With witty and creative uses of narration, this story tells of one of the most romantic novels of all time.

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Photo is courtesy of Carrie Johnson

When Mr Bingley moves to Netherfield Estate, Mrs Bennet gets excited as she hopes one of her daughters is to marry him. Having five daughters, she’s constantly trying to marry them off. Mr Bennet is a relaxed man compared to that of his wife, who is not as eager as his wife. When Jane meets Mr Bingley, they seem to have a mutual interest in each other. However, his sister doesn’t agree with their possible relationship. Meanwhile, Mr Darcy, a handsome and proud aristocrat, doesn’t make a good first impression with Elizabeth.

Joannah Tincey adapted the play, creating a theatrical experience of the novel. Starring two actors playing 21 characters that are distinguished and clear, finding the line between narrator and character. Her genius of exploring the 200-year-old story and turning it into a play that only uses Austen’s own words, is well thought and works brilliantly in the small space of the Jermyn Street Theatre.

Nick Underwood’s portrayal of Jane Bennett is elegant and feminine and an audience favourite. His coughing as Kitty creates laughter from beginning to end.

Two Bit Classics Pride and Prejudice Photo by Carrie Johnson
Mrs Bennet (Joannah Tincey) and Mr Bennet (Nick Underwood) | Carrie Johnson

Director Abigail Anderson created an engaging romantic play, bringing famous personas from British Literature to the stage. She uses the third person narrative that introduces a dialogue between two characters, and by addressing the audience, they create a sense of relationship.

Whereas it is slow at points, once you pick up the story, it’s easy to get lost in it. It also seems slightly confusing, the actors are running around, changing characters and it takes a while until you catch on. After understanding which person possesses what characteristic, it’s easy to follow their journey.

 

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Jane Bennet (Nick Underwood) and Elizabeth Bennet (Joannah Tincey) | Carrie Johnson

The show uses a creative approach of narration in order to change characters. Underwood and Tincey narrate while acting and therefore explaining who is speaking. One element that makes this play so beautiful are the little differences between each character. A pipe for Mr Bennet, a handkerchief for Mrs Bennet. A change of tone, accent or body language. Those details accentuate the amazing character work by the two actors, showing that they know their characters very well.

Pride and Prejudice runs at the Jermyn Street Theatre until 21 December.

@TwoBitClassics @jstheatre #PrideAndPrejudice

Scrooge and the Seven Dwarves | Review

★★★★☆ The Sleeping Trees,  Theatre 503

Directed by Simon Evans, Scrooge and the Seven Dwarves is wonderfully creative and a hilarious spectacle that ignites the imagination.

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John Woodbury (Scrooge), James Dunnell-Smith (One of the Seven Dwarves), Joshua George Smith (Snow White) | David Monteith-Hodge

The Sleeping Trees trio, John Woodburn (Scrooge, Santa Claus),  James Dunnell-Smith (Mrs Claus, Wicked Witch) and Joshua George Smith (Bob Cratchit, Snow White) have created their third  wonderfully chaotic panto that keeps throwing Christmas at you until you can’t help but feeling festive.

Christmas is ruined, the Wicked Witch of the West has stolen all the Christmas spirit, so who else but grumpy, old Ebenezer Scrooge to the rescue. Mrs Clause sends him on a journey, where he encounters the seven Dwarves (played by two actors) and Snow White. A T-Rex and Mary Poppins also make an appearance throughout the show.

Meanwhile, the trio encounter their own problems. Forgetting to book the 30 actor strong cast, they, again, have to put on the whole show themselves. Will the talent agent watching the pantomime choose them to be the new Hollywood superstars?

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Ben Hales (Musician and Composer) on the far left | David Monteith-Hodge

The threesome are witty and have the ability to keep the entire audience intrigued. Playing several characters each, they’re showing versatility and the ability to create characters that stand out.

Ben Hales (Musician and Composer) perfectly plays the part of the puzzled audience member who gets dragged into the show. Chaotic at points but with a catchy and repetitive song, they bring the show home whilst you find yourself singing along and feeling excited for the holidays.

They throw Christmas at you with immense amount of insanity,  and a lot of ingenious stage charisma. All in all, this panto is the work of three incredibly talented comedian actors, making you laugh from start to finish.

 

Scrooge and the Seven Dwarves runs at Theatre 503 until Saturday 7 January 2017

Twitter: @wesleepingtrees @theatre503 #Scrooge503