Dealing with post-show depression

Devastated fans explain what happened when their favourite show left the West End for good.

Sunny Afternoon closing night. Image by Harold Pinter Theatre
Sunny Afternoon closing night |Harold Pinter

“I’m missing a huge part of my life. I used to have somewhere to go to, knowing it would make me happy and feel good, I don’t anymore,” said Jessica Gray, 26.

Whether you’re a musical or play lover, London’s West End offers a wide range of shows: from the emotional Les Misèrables, to a juke box musical like Jersey Boys and Agatha Christie’s Mousetrap, the longest running show in London, there’s something to satisfy everyone’s tastes.

Every show accumulates a fan base with the musical becoming part of their life, developing friendships with supporters as well as cast members, following the show to other events and creating social media fan accounts becomes a normality.  So, what happens when a show closes?

Sunny Afternoon has grazed the West End for the two rock ‘n’ roll filled years. Not only has it accumulated a huge fan base, it has also won four Olivier Awards and has been praised by many stars, Mark Hamill being one of them.

In August 2016, the hit show on the rise and stardom of iconic English band The Kinks embarked on their first UK Tour, with the West End cast doing their last performance on October 29th 2016.

Below, three very dedicated followers shared their experiences.

Deborah Gilpin

Deborah Gilpin on stage at her 50th show with part of the cast I Image by Deborah Gilpin
Deborah on stage at her 50th show with part of the cast |Deborah Gilpin

Deborah,28, undoubtedly set the record for seeing the most shows within the Sunny Afternoon fan base, hitting the mark at 279 times.

How involved were you with Sunny Afternoon?

Deborah Gilpin: I ended up seeing 279 shows, although I’d have liked to reach the 300 mark.

Throughout her visits, Debbie quickly became friends with other regular audience members, together they started a Twitter fan account. “We just wanted to bring people together initially, then this year we’ve tried our best to promote the second cast as they seemed to be getting less attention, which led to the Cast Member & Understudy of the Month awards,” said Debbie.

How are you coping with the show leaving the West End?

I had no idea how to cope with it at the beginning, my plan was to make the most of it being there, enjoying every minute of it and waiting to see how everything went afterwards. Luckily I have my theatre reviewing keeping me busy. I’m waiting for more of the actors (from both casts) to get new jobs or announce gigs, I’m going to follow them on their new projects. Plus I’m excited to see what the tour is like, I’m planning to see it once it reaches a venue closer to me.

Ksenia Nemchinova

Ksenia Nemchinova outside the Harold Pinter Theatre. Image by Ksenia Nemchinova
Ksenia Nemchinova outside the Harold Pinter Theatre | Ksenia Nemchinova

Ksenia,30,  travelled to London from Russia a lot, seeing the show 122 times: “Being a Kinks fan, I’d been following the development of the show since its first workshop in December 2012.

“I fell in love with Sunny Afternoon and there was no turning back. I’m also co-running the fan page with Debbie and Jess”.

How you’re feeling now and how you’re trying to cope with its ending, do you have a special plan for that?

Ksenia Nemchinova: I’ve never been this attached to a show before so it’s not easy to process and to cope. Sunny Afternoon may not be in London anymore, but I’ve seen the touring production several times and I have grown to love them dearly, so it’s definitely not the end for me, the tour will keep me going for another few months.

And after that, who knows? The show may be back in London again, maybe if we all wish really hard…

Jessica Gray

Jessica Gray with part of the cast at the stage door. Image by Jessica Gray
Jessica Gray with part of the cast at the stage door | Jessica Gray

Jessica has been following the show since its very beginning: “I first saw Sunny Afternoon at the beginning of October 2014.

“I had been invited to review the show for my blog, and became a fan immediately.”

“I started a fan page first on Twitter and then on Facebook and eventually I made arrangements with the show’s marketing company for an official Sunny Afternoon Challenge Week to happen.”

“During it, we would attend every show over a week and blog about it daily, with a new challenge being assigned to us every day.”

What are your plans now?

Jessica Gray: I’m actually leaving London – not exactly because of the show closing, but I’d be lying if I said that it didn’t make my decision a lot easier. I’d like to see the tour again, however following it around the country isn’t an option for me. I’d mostly like to see what actors from the West End production do in the future in terms of new shows.

The world doesn’t end when a show ends. There are different ways to cope with it, whether that is concentrating on other shows, supporting the cast members in new projects or trying to stay away. Even when the show has ended, you’ll always have the memories. Not to forget the cast recording.

Moonchild Theatre Company: “The Planets have aligned for us”

A new theatre company has landed in London. The Moonchild Theatre Company is staging its first play Pluto at the Baron’s Court Theatre, starting 18 April.

unnamed
Charlotte Price (Charon/ Prof. Furtham) and Liam Joseph (Pluto)

The two co-founders Liam Joseph and Callum O’Brien met as Front of House staff at the Harold Pinter Theatre. Liam, whose background is theatre and acting and Callum who studied film, teamed up and not only co-found their theatre company but also created their first production. Callum wrote the script and is directing the play with Liam producing and starring in it. They both have a passion for space and astronomy and are interested in current affairs; socially and politically. Liam had already paid for the space at the Baron’s Court Theatre, so he asked Callum to write him a play.

“Pluto was an alignment of planets”, says Callum.

“When I was writing about space, at the same time I was reading an article on North Carolina passing a law in 2016 that makes you use the bathroom that you were born into. So, if you’re transgender that causes confusion. It was passed by a bunch of people who would never see the effect it would have on the community.”

He continues: “I was thinking about space and I was thinking about this story. People who have had their identity defined by people who do not know them and it’s quite similar to Pluto, who was a planet but is no longer a planet and it was defined for “him” based on people who have never been to the planet. I took these two stories and married them and we’ve created this unusual piece of work, but it works.”

“It could mean a lot of things to a lot of people, we deal with politics, we deal with friendship, depression and you could take it literally and it could be a story of planets.”

The two criticise the London theatre industry. “A lot of shows nowadays cater to a very specific or older audience.”

Callum adds: “I think new writing can cater more towards a millennial audience. A lot that Pluto deals with is frustration, your voice has been stolen from you, your agency has been deprived, you cannot speak out for what you want to and it reflects the way millennials are portrayed as; numb observers.”

As director, Callum wants to make Pluto and turn it into an iconic object that could be the “figurehead of the LGBT cause.” However, he is worried about trying to tackle too many issues in their production. “We run the risk of writing something that could be about everything and nothing.”

Unlike many other theatre companies, Moonchild Theatre Company caters to millennials; “I’d rather make theatre accessible, but a lot of shows follow the older generation, and the tickets are so expensive.”

“All great artistic movements cater to the young and it’s foolish to overlook them, they will inherit the world one day. What you teach them now, that’s what they’ll take with them later in life and if you can get them interested in theatre and art now, hopefully there will be a future for art, especially in a world with an administration that cut art funding and pride things like guns and war.”

Looking at the news and everything that’s been going on recently the play seems to “come at the right time. I think there’s something happening right now, something is going to happen soon, the young people are beginning to regroup and feel there is this slight injustice against something.”

The two recount how everything has happened at the same time and how the timing of meeting at the Harold Pinter couldn’t have been better. “It’s like a volcano, everything has come at once, LGBT communities, Trump and technology. It never would’ve happened hadn’t we worked in the theatre together. Liam and I wouldn’t have met. Charlotte Price, who is also in Pluto also works at the Harold Pinter as front of house, so does Aimee Leigh the production manager and Giuliana Davolio the set designer for Pluto.”

“We’re incredibly lucky to work in such a supportive venue”

Their manager Rachel is interested in what their doing, as well as ATG. “It makes it worth what we’re doing, to know that your manager is interested in what you’re doing outside of work, it’s really warming and quite rare, not many theatres have that kind of support. She’s been so nice, she’s let us put the flyers around the building and helps us put them in other theatres as well”, says producer Liam Joseph.

“It’s encouraging to know that someone in such a high position cares about new writing and helping her staff .”

The rehearsal for the play is going well according to Callum. Even though this is a stressful time, he finds it rewarding. “It’s the most interesting learning curve for me, knowing how to develop the script. All four of us have fine tuned it and arranged it and moulded this play to be something that we all want to be part of.”

In the future the team wants to create and produce theatre as well as film. “We also want to look at merchandising our company, because we feel like we’re very sell-able”, says Liam. “We’ve got a cool logo.”

“Creatively we would like to go off in every branch in media and art.”

After Pluto, the theatre company will potentially put up an exhibit of pictures from Pluto’s set and production in an art gallery in Camden. “That’s what interested us, because theatre is never looked at through still images, with the exhibition, you meet theatre and film in the middle.”

Help Moonchild Theatre Company stage their first production and donate to their IndieGOGO page.

IndieGOGO from Liam Joseph on Vimeo.

Pluto transfers to the Cockpit Theatre in August. It’s running at the Camden venue from 14 August until 17 August and is part of the Camden Fringe Festival.

#iheartPLUTO @MoonchildPluto

Student Obsessions | Chapter 1

In this new series, I uncover the truth and find out what it’s really like to be a student with an obsession. In chapter one, I speak to Founder and Editor of Millennial London, Sarah Louhichi, about her obsession; West End Musical, ‘Sunny Afternoon’. 

sarah-at-sunny
©Sarah Louhichi

AC: What would you say is your current obsession?

SL: I’m a huge theatre fan, but lately I’ve been obsessed with one show in particular: Sunny Afternoon. I’ve seen it, so far, 34 times.

AC: To people who have no clue, what is the show about? 

SL: It’s the story about the English band, The Kinks, who were around when the Beatles were. The front man of the band, Ray Davies, was involved in making the show. It follows their story and how they got together, how they developed as a band and what issues they encounter. It also tells the story about him and his wife and how they met. All the songs fit so well with the story of the band.

AC: Why are you so obsessed with this particular show? 

SL: Well, there are several reasons. Firstly the show is fucking awesome. It’s such a good show, it’s fun, it’s heart felt and the music is great. It doesn’t really feel like a musical at all when you see it. The way the theatre is designed as well, you’re sitting at the front by tables. It’s like a sixties club and you’re actually watching The Kinks.

sarah-tickets
©Sarah Louhichi

AC: What drew you to watching this show? How did it first come about for you?

SL: I used to go to this particular theatre (Harold Pinter Theatre) a lot for a different show, so I was already in the theatre scene. So when I found out about the show, after hearing good things about it a year ago, I went and I’ve been hooked ever since. Before I went to see Sunny, I never knew anything about The Kinks. I didn’t know The Kinks existed.

AC: Other than Sunny Afternoon, what other musical or play have you seen at the West End in London?

SL: I’ve seen a lot but recently I saw Kinky Boots, although I prefer plays to musicals. Last week I saw Unfaithful with Matthew Lewis, the week before that I saw Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. I’m actually going to see the new production of 1984 in a few days, which I’m excited about.

AC: What would you say is your favourite play?

SL: People, Places and Things is my absolute favourite. The main actress, Denise Gough won the Oliver award this year for best actress. It’s such a contemporary play. It just resonates with what’s going on in the world so perfectly, and the issues and problems that people encounter. I would also recommend The Cursed Child. They put so much detail and effort into the show, that even if you didn’t like Harry Potter, you could appreciate the theatrical aspects of it.

AC: So I hear that Sunny Afternoon is finishing next month, but what one thing would you miss the most?

SL: The atmosphere, because what brings me back to the show over and over again, is not one scene or one song or an actor, it’s just everything. I’m outside the theatre and all I want to do is go inside and see it. There’s so much energy and excitement every time I go.

AC: What advice would you give to current students with an obsession?

SL: Go for it, have fun, don’t be ashamed and be proud of your obsession. It’s nice to be passionate about something, because it means you are living your life and enjoying it to the fullest, rather than just sitting at home doing nothing and being lazy.

AC: How do you handle student life with your obsession of having to see this musical at least once a week?

SL: I always make sure University comes first. If I spontaneously buy tickets, then I go straight from Uni. I make sure I’m done with all my work first, and that I don’t have an early class the next day. I just make sure there is a balance between the two.

AC: What would you say is the best thing about living in London?

SL: Everything is so accessible especially with the tube, you can get to every place so quickly and there’s so much to do here, you never get bored. You can always find new ways to do things. As a theatre lover, there is so much more to see than just the popular tourist West End musicals and plays.

AC: What play or musical do you want to see, but haven’t had the chance yet?

SL: I really want to see Les Misérables, Funny Girl (which is sadly ending soon), Aladdin, The Entertainer with Kenneth Branagh, No Man’s Land with Sir Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart, and Waiting for Waiting for Godot which is a play about understudies.

AC: These days you get quite a famous cast appearing on the West End from Films and TV shows. Have you ever been to see a show just to see a specific actor?

SL: I went to see The Maids because Uzo Aduba was in it, she’s in Orange is the New Black, and only recently in June I went to see Doctor Faustus, which had Kit Harrington in from Game of Thrones. It’s always interesting to see people from the screen perform live.

sarah-at-the-maids
©Sarah Louhichi

AC: How would you sum up your experience as a student with an obsession in a few words?

SL: Time consuming, life changing and an incredible experience.

You can see Sarah’s latest post here, follow her on Twitter. Also, check out Sunny Afternoon on Twitter and on their Website.