Unfaithful | Review

★★★★☆ Found 111, Unfaithful

Director Adam Penford creates an intimate play from author Owen McCafferty, that uncovers the vulnerability of relationships in a setting that leaves no space for privacy.

UNFAITHFUL pic

The problems couples encounter in various stages of their life’s and aspects. Tom and Joan, have been married and together for many years, both in their mid-fifties are unsatisfied with their relationship and life. The couple is unhappy and have stopped caring, or at least they think they did. When the husband confesses to his wife that he had slept with someone else, the marriage seems to fall apart. She hires an escort, whether it’s to get back at him or just to feel something for once. Peter and Tara, a young couple, both in their twenties. A clever girl, who dropped out of university and now works at the checkout of a Tesco and her boyfriend, who’s an escort. The two couples cross lives without knowing how much they influence each other.

McCafferty explores the intricate elements on life and relationships, he uses detailed descriptions of the character’s feelings, expressing them with honesty and the harsh reality of obstacles in a couples communication.

Niamh Cusack delivers an outstanding performance, with a perfect range of emotion, strong and subtle whenever appropriate but always enough for the small audience to take notice. In general, the relationships between each of the four actors is very clear through the way they talk and look at each other. The characters are very relatable, therefore it’s easy to understand and agree with their decisions. Sean Campion conveys a man who has lost passion for life and feels adrift, it’s almost impossible not to feel sorry for him. From a child star, playing Neville Longbottom in the Harry Potter series, Matthew Lewis, shows an extraordinary transition to playing a confident escort. Ruta Gedmintas delivers a brilliant performance, with her facial expressions and body language alone.

Staging is simple and uncomplicated, surrounded by the audience. The words are left to be the main aspect of the show, making the play very pure and powerful. Scenes are interesting in the sense that none of the actors ever leave the room, when one couple is on the stage the other is either sitting on a bench next to it or in a corner of it, watching and helping during scene changes. The intimate setting works well with the play and enhances the feeling of peeking into the two couples’ private life.

A truthful, real and powerful show that leaves the audience pondering about the delicacy and persistency of relationships.

 

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